TPU Aerosol

Title: POLYURETHANE AEROSOL COMPOSITIONS, ARTICLES, AND RELATED METHODS

Number/Link: US20170198150

Applicant/Assignee: 3M

Publication Date: 13-july-2017  (priority PCT)

“Gist”: Aqueous dispersion of a hydrazide-extended  TPU can be sprayed as aerosol to make protective films

Why it is interesting: An aqueous thermoplastic polyurethane dispersion is prepared from a non-yellowing diisocyanate, e.g. bis(4-isocyanatocyclohexyl), a diol (e.g. PPG2000), a difunctional hydrazine or hydrazide chain extender (e.g. 1,3-diaminourea) and a water solubilizing compound (e.g. dimethylolpropionic acid).  Together with a propellant the, composition is shelf-stable and can be aerosol-sprayed to form clear, non-yellowing protective films.

3M’s aerosol-sprayed protective film.

TPU from Oleic Acid

Title: RENEWABLY DERIVED THERMOPLASTIC POLYESTER-BASED URETHANES AND METHODS OF MAKING AND USING THE SAME

Number/Link: US2017/0145145

Applicant/Assignee: Trent University

Publication Date: 25-may-2017

“Gist”: Thermoplastic polyurethane made entirely from C9 monomers derived from oleic acid.

Why it is interesting: Azaleic acid can be prepared by oxidative cleavage of the oleic acid double bond.  Azaleic acid in turn can be converted to 1,9-nonanediol and to 1,7-heptamethyldiisocyanate via azides and Curtius rearrangment (see previous blog post). In this invention a polyester diol is prepared from azaleic acid and nonanediol and is then reacted with 1,7-heptamethylenediisocyanate together with nonanediol as chain extender, resulting in a phase-separated TPU. Best properties are obtained when the nonanediol is first prepolymerized with the diisocyanate. The TPU is said to degrade without cytotoxic degradation products, and is therefore useful for medical applications such as resorbable implants and scaffolds.
Related case: US2017/0145146.

Oleic Acid

 

Crystalline High-Hardblock TPU

Title: CRYSTALLINE HIGH MODULUS THERMOPLASTIC POLYURETHANE

Number/LinkWO2017079101  WO2017079188

Applicant/Assignee: Lubrizol

Publication Date: 11 May 2017

“Gist”: High-hardblock TPU using ‘stacking’ chain extenders and MDI

Why it is interesting: Thermoplastic polyurethanes with hardblock levels of 75% and higher were first patented by Upjohn in 1981 in a “classic” patent which has been discussed before in this blog. These materials – often marketed under the ‘ISOPLAST’ tradename- are usually produced from a diol, 4,4′-MDI and a (mixture of) chain extender(s) comprising a ‘non-stacking’ chain extender like cyclohexanedimethylol, neopentylglycol, MPdiol etc. to control crystallinity. In the current invention only ‘stacking’ chain extenders are used in an otherwise identical composition, resulting -unsurprisingly- in a more crystalline material with a higher modulus and melting temperature. It is also said that these materials are easier to compound with e.g. fire retardants.
Even if this idea were formally ‘new’ I doubt its inventiveness and therefore its patentability.

The famous ISOPLAST(TM) nail

TPU with Moisture-Controlled Flexibility

Title: THERMOPLASTIC POLYURETHANE MATERIALS FOR FORMING MEDICAL DEVICES

Number/Link: Wo2017/066381

Applicant/Assignee: Becton Dickinson

Publication Date: 20 april 2017

“Gist”: High hardblock TPU, based on side-chain branched chain extenders, softens in water

Why it is interesting: The invention is related to thermoplastic polyurethanes for medical applications especially for intravenous catheters. These catheters need to have a high stiffness when inserted but need to become flexible once in place to prevent injuries. This is accomplished with TPUs based on MDI, PTMEG and either 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-propanediol (neopentylglycol) or 2-methyl-1,3-propanediol (MPdiol) and having a hardblock content of 50 to 75%. The examples show indeed an increased stiffness at ambient conditions and a larger softening when soaked in saline solution compared to TPU produced with a linear chain extender. It is however not mentioned which linear chain extender was used.

Neopentylglycol

SiC-PU Nanocomposites

Patent Title: POLYURETHANE/UREA SILICON CARBIDE NANOCOMPOSITE

 Number/Link: WO2017/027231

Applicant/Assignee: 3M

Publication date: 16-feb-2017

Gist”: Surface modified SiC particles are dispersed in and covalently bound to a polyurethane matrix

Why it is interesting: Silicon carbide (carborundum) particles with an average particle size of about 500 nm are NCO-functionalized by reacting with a surface modfifying agent, e.g 2-triethoxysilylpropylisocyanate. The modified particles are then dispersed and covalently reacted into a polyurethane/polyurea matrix in an amount of 50-55% (w/w) on the composition. The composites can be made into highly erosion resistant films, for use on the outer surface of aircraft.

3-triethoxysilylpropylisocyanate

3-triethoxysilylpropylisocyanate