PU Flexible Foams with Reduced Acetaldehyde Emissions

Title: METHOD FOR THE REDUCTION OF ALDEHYDE EMISSION IN POLYURETHANE FOAM

Number/Link: WO2017/134296

Applicant/Assignee: Huntsman

Publication Date: 10 August 2017

“Gist”: Cyanoacetamide is used as aldehyde scavenger

Why it is interesting: Reduction of aldehyde emissions from (especially flexible) polyurethane foams remains an important issue and has already been discussed a number of times on this blog. According to this case the use of (pref) 0.05 to 0.5 pbw of cyanoacetamide in a flexible foam formulation will reduce the emission of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde, and possibly of higher aldehydes as well.
While an interesting compound, the use of cyanoacetamide in polyurethanes is not new and the effect is hardly surprising.

Cyanoacetamide

 

Non-Isocyanate Polyurethane Flexible Foams

Title: NON ISOCYANATE POLYURETHANE FOAMS

Number/LinkUS2017/0218124

Applicant/Assignee: Faurecia

Publication Date: 3 august 2017

“Gist”: Flex foams from a blend of two polyfunctional cyclocarbonates, a polyamine and HFC blowing agent.

Why it is interesting: While non-isocyanate polyurethanes are well known by now, examples of NIPU foams, especially flexible foams are rare. According to this case NIPU foams ‘having good resilience and low density’ can be prepared by reacting two polyfunctional carbonates A and B with a polyamine in the presence of a blowing agent and a catalyst. Cyclocarbonate A is (pref) trimethylolpropaneglycidylether carbonate and B is a polyetherpolyol with the OH groups replaced by glycidylcarbonate groups, for example an alkoxyalated trimethylolpropaneglycidylether carbonate. The polyamine is e.g. 1,6 diaminohexane.  The ratio A:B is preferably about 60:40.  In the examples no value for the resilience is given (but my guess based on the Tg is that it is probably not very high) and the lowest moulded density achieved is 140 kg/m³. So still a long way to go..

Glycidylether carbonate of alkoxylkated trimethylolpropane

Polyols from Natural Oils using the Alkyne Zipper Reaction

Title: POLYURETHANE MATERIALS FORMED FROM UNSATURATED PLANT OILS VIA AN ALKYNE ZIPPER REACTION

Number/Link: US2017/0166679 US2017/0166680

Applicant/Assignee: IBM

Publication Date: 15-june-2017

“Gist”: Oils are turned into alkyne alcohols, ‘zippered’ and oxidized to polyols

Why it is interesting: This is yet  another IBM patent application about interesting, albeit somewhat exotic, chemistry and featuring only “prophetic” examples. In this case unsaturated natural oils are first converted into unsaturated alcohols and then into alkynes by bromination and elimination.  The internal alkynes are then converted to terminal alkynes by an “alkyne zipper reaction” and then into hydroxyl groups by hydroboration and epoxidation/ring-opening. This series of reactions should result in polyols having two primary- and one or more secondary OH groups, useful, for example, for the preparation of sound absorbing foams.

Reaction sequence according to the invention

Polycarbonate PU Foams with Reduced VOC Emissions

Title: POLYURETHANE FOAMS BASED ON POLYETHER CARBONATE POLYOLS

Number/Link: WO2017/085201 (German)

Applicant/Assignee: Covestro

Publication Date: 26-may-2017

“Gist”: Use of urea reduces the formation of propylenecarbonate from polycarbonate polyols

Why it is interesting: Covestry is betting heavily on polyethercarbonate polyols for use in polyurethane foams, using the carbon-negative footprint as a selling point. The use of polyethercarbonate polyols in PU foams can, however, result in the formation of propylenecarbonate resulting from a retro reaction promoted by conventional amine catalysts. Propylenecarbonate will contribute to the total VOC emissions of foams and other materials. According to this invention, the retro reaction can -surprisingly- be prevented or reduced by using urea or urea-derivatives in the foam formulation. In the examples urea and dimethylaminopropylurea are used together with a tin catalyst,  polyethercarbonate polyols and TDI to produce flexible foams with reduced propylenecarbonate content.

Propylenecarbonate

 

 

High Resiliency Polyurethane Foams

Title: HIGH RESILIENCY POLYURETHANE FOAMS MADE WITH HIGH FUNCTIONALITY, HIGH EQUIVALENT WEIGHT POLYOLS WITH MAINLY SECONDARY HYDROXYL GROUPS

Number/Link: WO2017/062150

Applicant/Assignee: Dow

Publication Date: 13 April 2017

“Gist”: Use of high functionality polyols increases the resilience of flex foams

Why it is interesting:  According to this invention the resilience of flexible PU foams can be increased by using, as part of the polyol composition, a random EO/PO polyether polyol which has an equivalent weight of at least 1500, a functionality of  at least 5, a secondary hydroxyl group content of at least 70%, an unsaturation value of at most 0.01 meq/g and an EO content between 5 and 30%.  In the examples, sorbitol initiated polyols are used in both MDI and TDI-based systems, resulting in ball rebound values of up to 60% at densities of about 30 kg/m³.  As I have shown in the past (US5521226) the same (or arguably an even stronger) effect on resilience can be obtained with other high functionality polyols, indicating that the unsaturation value, primary OH content, EO content and equivalent weight are probably not relevant to the resilience increase.

Sorbitol