Polyamide Polymer Polyols

Patent Title: POLYAMIDE DISPERSION IN POLYOL AND PREPARATION THEREOF

 Number/Link: WO2017/216209

Applicant/Assignee:  BASF

Publication date: 21 December 2017

Gist”: Polyamide particles from polyether diamine and adipic acid are dispersed in polyol

Why it is interesting: Conventional polymer polyols contain either SAN-, polyurethane- or polyurea particles (see e.g. here).  According to this invention, polymer polyol dispersions can also be prepared by reacting a diamine, containing at least 50 wt% of a linear polyether having two terminal primary amine groups with a dicarboxylic acid (e.g. adipic acid) in a polyether polyol.  The reaction results in a dispersion of polyamide particles in the polyether polyol, stabilized by the polyether diamine. The polymer polyols are useful for flexible foam production and are said to show an improved hydrolysis resistance.

adipicacid

Adipic acid

PCM-Containing Viscoelastic Foams

Patent Title: VISCOELASTIC POLYURETHANE FOAM WITH COATING

Number/Link: WO2017/210439

Applicant/Assignee: Dow

Publication date: 7 December 2017

“Gist”: Open-celled visco-foam is impregnated with an aqueous dispersant composition containing a phase change material

Why it is interesting: According to Dow, open-celled viscoelastic polyurethane foams can be prepared by using a acid-modified polyolefin latex cellopener, as discussed before in this blog. In the current invention these open-celled foams are impregnated with an aqueous composition comprising an ionomer (a sodium salt of a maleic anhydride copolymer) and a microencapsulated PCM. The composition is said to ‘coat’ the cell struts with PCM and increase the comfort properties of the foam.
I wonder if with this process enough PCM can be in introduced to have a noticeable effect.

bluewave

Dow’s proprietary BLUEWAVE dispersion process is used to prepare the cellopening latex

TPU Aerosol

Title: POLYURETHANE AEROSOL COMPOSITIONS, ARTICLES, AND RELATED METHODS

Number/Link: US20170198150

Applicant/Assignee: 3M

Publication Date: 13-july-2017  (priority PCT)

“Gist”: Aqueous dispersion of a hydrazide-extended  TPU can be sprayed as aerosol to make protective films

Why it is interesting: An aqueous thermoplastic polyurethane dispersion is prepared from a non-yellowing diisocyanate, e.g. bis(4-isocyanatocyclohexyl), a diol (e.g. PPG2000), a difunctional hydrazine or hydrazide chain extender (e.g. 1,3-diaminourea) and a water solubilizing compound (e.g. dimethylolpropionic acid).  Together with a propellant the, composition is shelf-stable and can be aerosol-sprayed to form clear, non-yellowing protective films.

3M’s aerosol-sprayed protective film.

Preventing Ostwald Ripening in Rigid PU Foams

Title: PRODUCTION OF FINE CELL FOAMS USING A CELL AGING INHIBITOR

Number/Link: WO2017093058  (German)

Applicant/Assignee: Evonik

Publication Date: 8 June 2017

“Gist”: Perfluorinated hydrocabons reduce Ostwald ripnening in PU foam formulations

Why it is interesting: Polymeric foams form by nucleation and growth of gass bubbles in the reacting mixture followed by (or simultaneous with) ageing of the bubbles through coalesence and Ostwald ripening, i.e. the growth of larger bubbles at the expense of smaller bubbles. Ostwald ripening ultimately results in fewer and larger cells, which has a negative effect on the thermal insulation properties of rigid foams. According to this invention the ripening effect can be prevented or reduced by incorporating in the foam formulation an “Ostwald hydrophobe”, i.e. a highly hydrophobic liquid which is largely immiscible with the reacting mixture. Examples of such liquids are perfluorinated hydrocabons with a boiling point of less than 150°C, e.g. perfluoropentane, perfluorocyclohexane and perfluoroisohexene (used in the examples).

Perfluorocyclohexane

 

Aerogels from Isocyanates and Epoxies

Patent Title: ORGANIC AEROGELS BASED ON ISOCYANATE AND CYCLIC ETHER POLYMER NETWORKS

 Number/Link: WO2017016755

Applicant/Assignee: Henkel

Publication date: 2-feb-2017

Gist”: Isocyanate and epoxy are reacted in solvent and supercritically dried

Why it is interesting: While most ‘conventional’ aerogels are based on silica, organic aerogels, especially isocyanate-based aerogels, are also well known: polyurethane-, polyurea-, polyamide-, polyimide-, polycarbodiimide- and polyisocyanurate aerogels have all been reported. This invention adds another type of aerogel based on the reaction of isocyanates and cyclic ethers, esp. oxetanes and oxiranes. The isocyanate with a functionality of (pref.) 2 to 3, (e.g. 4,4′-MDI or methylidynetri-p-phenyletriisocyanate) is reacted with a cyclic ether  of (pref.) functionality of 2 to 3, (e.g. N,N-diglycidyl-4-glycidyloxianiline) in a suitable solvent (e.g. DMAc). After washing, the gel is dried with supercritical carbon dioxide. The materials are useful for thermal insulation and are said to have better mechanical properties compared to other organic aerogels.

N,N-Diglycidyl-4-glycidyloxyaniline

N,N-Diglycidyl-4-glycidyloxyaniline