Polyurethane Elastomers with High Abrasion Resistance

Title: POLYURETHANE WITH IMPROVED ABRASION RESISTANCE, THE METHOD FOR PREPARING THE SAME AND USE THEREOF

 Number/Link: US2013/0274365

Applicant/Assignee: Bayer

Publication date: 17-10-2013 (priority PCT/DE)

Gist”: Small amounts of polyisoprene improve abrasion resistance of elastomers

Why it is interesting: It is known that polyether polyols have advantages over polyester polyols for the production of polyurethane elastomers: the resulting elastomers have better low temperature properties, better hydroslysis resistance and antimicrobial properties, however the mechanical properties as well as the abrasion resistance are lower. According to this invention the abrasion resistance of polyether elastomers can be greatly improved by incorporating a small amount of polyisoprene in the formulation. In the examples 2% polyisoprene with a MW of 28,000 or 45,000 is used in a formulation of polyether polyol, butanediol, water and catalyst together with a non-disclosed isocyanate. The resulting elastomers have a density of 600 kg/m3 and show a markedly improved abrasion resistance.

Structural units present in polyisoprene

Structural units present in polyisoprene

POLYURETHANE WITH IMPROVED ABRASION RESISTANCE, THE METHOD FOR PREPARING THE SAME AND USE THEREOF

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2 Comments

  1. Bert Maes

     /  October 22, 2013

    A density of 600kg/m³ makes me think of a foam rather then an elastomer

    Reply
    • Hello Bert,
      You’re right, it’s often called a ‘foamed elastomer’, also blown- or microcellular elastomer. In fact flexible foams are also blown elastomers. In principle an elastomer or rubber is a material that shows entropy driven elasticity as opposed to energy driven elasticity as e.g. metals. But in the end it’s a matter of convention I guess.
      Best regards
      Geert

      Reply

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